Animals

Venomous snakes and spiders do inhabit the country through which the Hume & Hovell Ultra passes, however they are rarely seen. Nevertheless, Runners need to make themselves aware of the appropriate treatment for snake and spider bites. Caution is required when approaching brumbies or kangaroos, they maybe frightened.

Trail Conditions

Entrants must cope with rough trail surfaces, precipitous ascents and descents, mud, creek crossings, and slippery rocks and roots. In some places Runners will need to walk because of the nature of the trail.  These conditions may change due to extreme weather conditions close to the day.

Water Crossings

Most water crossings have been bridged, but caution must be taken when crossing streams.

Navigation

Although the Hume & Hovell Ultra is marked for its entire length, the markers are sometimes hard to see and could be missed at running speed. Great care needs to be exercised in following the course and all runners are advised to carefully follow their progress on the detailed maps and detailed directions which are available on the race website. If you believe at any time that you may not be on the correct course,do not attempt to find your way cross country.

 

 

You will find this logo along the track, in addition there will be ORANGE Tape hanging from bushes with Grey Luminous Tape on the night sections.

 

 

If you are unsure of your route, backtrack to where you last saw a course marker and try to find other markers showing the direction of the course. If you are unable to work out where you are, move to higher ground, if possible to do so without travelling cross country, and try calling on your mobile phone. Race Director Peter Fitzpatrick on 0428423633 and you should key this number into your phone’s directory in advance. A list of other contact numbers will be available at the start on race day. If this is not feasible and you are unable to find your way, stay where you are!! If you do become injured, exhausted or ill, STAY ON THE TRAIL. You will be found there either by another runner or by the sweeper. If you feel dizzy, disorientated or confused, do not risk falling. Sit or lie down on the trail until you recover or are found. An unconscious Runner even a few feet off the trail could be impossible to find until it is too late.